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Entomologist Job Description, Career as an Entomologist, Salary, Employment - Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

entomologists insects research control

Education and Training: Doctoral degree

Salary: Median—$51,200 per year

Employment Outlook: Good

Definition and Nature of the Work

Entomologists are biological scientists who study insects. There are nearly a million known species of insects, and thousands of new species are discovered every year. Insects make up over three-quarters of all the species of animals. All insects play roles in ecosystems. Some roles are beneficial and some harmful to humans. Bees, for example, pollinate plants and produce honey. Many other insects help bacteria and fungi break down organic matter and form soil. Some insects damage growing crops and spoil harvests in storage. This causes farms to lose millions of dollars every year in the United States. They can also physically harm humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife. For instance, females of some species of Anopheles mosquitoes carry the causative agent of malaria and can transmit it to humans. Beetles can wipe out entire forests. An insect known as the screw-worm fly kills thousands of cattle each year.

Some entomologists study insects to learn more about their basic life processes. Others direct their research toward finding ways to control harmful insects and use desirable insects to advantage.

Entomologists are specialized zoologists or animal biologists. Their field is known as entomology. About one-third of all entomologists work for government agencies in fields such as agriculture and food inspection. Others are employed by colleges and universities. Companies that make insecticides, pest control companies, medical centers, and museums also employ entomologists.

Although their jobs vary widely, most entomologists do some research or laboratory work. They may study the life cycles and body processes of insects as well as their group behavior. They use scientific instruments and sometimes collect or observe insects in their natural habitats. They are often assisted by biological technicians or pest control workers.

Entomologists are searching for ways to control or eliminate pests in infested areas without destroying other forms of life. Instead of using deadly poisons, they are developing ways to trap insects or to sterilize them so that they cannot reproduce. They are helping to develop crops that are insect resistant. Entomologists are also experimenting with ways to use birds or harmless insects to control the population of destructive insects. Entomologists must have knowledge of related fields, including horticulture, genetics, physiology, forestry, and microbiology. They often work closely with other scientists, such as plant pathologists, who are experts in plant disease, or with veterinarians.

An entomologist may study insects to find ways to control harmful insects and to use desirable insects to an advantage. (© Ed Young/Corbis.)

Education and Training Requirements

You generally need a doctoral degree to become an entomologist. You can major in entomology, biology, or zoology as an undergraduate and continue with a specialized study of insects in graduate school. Graduates with bachelor's degrees can find jobs as inspectors of food products, advanced biological technicians, or sales representatives for firms that make insecticides. However, their opportunities for advancement are limited. Those who have earned a master's degree in entomology are qualified for some jobs in teaching or applied research. You usually need a doctoral degree for a job as an administrator or for a teaching and research position at a university. It takes about four years to earn a bachelor's degree and another one or two years to earn a master's degree. You must spend about two or three additional years in school to get a doctoral degree. In order to keep up with new developments in your field, you should continue to study throughout your career.

Getting the Job

Your professors and college placement office may be able to give you information about getting a job as an entomologist. Professional journals, newspaper classifieds, and job banks on the Internet are good sources of job openings. You can also apply directly to colleges and universities, private firms, and government agencies that conduct research concerning insects and insect control. You may have to pass a civil service examination to get a government job.

Advancement Possibilities and Employment Outlook

There are many advancement opportunities for entomologists, especially for those who have a doctoral degree. They can become directors of research in government agencies or private firms. Those who work in universities can advance to the rank of full professor. Some entomologists start their own consulting or pest control businesses. Others become recognized for important discoveries that result from their research.

Although entomology is a rather small field with a narrow range of issues, there are still many unsolved problems in insect control. Although past research has led to the successful control of insects, more research is necessary as insects and diseases continue to adapt to pesticides and as soil fertility and water quality deteriorate due to the use of harmful chemicals. Both government and private industry are expected to devote funds to research into these issues. The job outlook is good through the year 2014 for entomologists with advanced degrees. Entomologists will also be needed to replace workers who retire or leave the field for other reasons. There will be keen competition for teaching jobs in colleges and universities.

Working Conditions

Working conditions for entomologists depend on the type of job. Many spend part of their time in offices and classrooms. Research entomologists usually work in well-lighted, well-equipped laboratories. Those who work with dangerous chemicals and insects must follow safety rules. Entomologists who work and consult with farmers spend much of their time on farms. Entomologists may have to inspect grain elevators or the holds of ships. Other entomologists may find themselves in remote lands studying rare insects or looking for new species. Entomologists involved in pest control may face strong odors and other unpleasant conditions at times. Working hours vary and are often flexible. Entomologists may work more than forty hours per week, especially on field trips or when experiments need to be monitored around the clock. In addition, entomologists must spend time reading and studying to keep up with new scientific developments that affect their work.

Entomologists must have an aptitude for science. They must have the patience to carry out carefully designed experiments over long periods of time. They should be creative and curious to explore new areas in the study of insects. Entomologists should be able to work both independently and as part of a scientific team. They also need to be able to clearly express themselves orally and in writing.

Where to Go for More Information

American Entomological Society
1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA 19103-1195
(215) 561-3978
http://www.acnatsci.org/hosted/aes/

Entomological Society of America
10001 Derekwood Lane, Ste. 100
Lanham, MD 20706-4876
(301) 731-4538
http://www.entsoc.org

Earnings and Benefits

Earnings depend on the education and experience of the entomologist, the location, and the kind of job. Entomologists are often grouped with plant scientists when looking at earnings. The median annual earnings of plant scientists was $51,200 in 2004. Entomologists generally receive such benefits as paid holidays and vacations, health insurance, and pension plans.

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almost 6 years ago

This is my dream job I always wanted too find a new type of insect!!!!!

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over 6 years ago

Thx so much! Im doing a career project and i think this is what i want to do it on. I LUV BUGS!!!

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almost 7 years ago

Thanks for all the information is was very helpfull!!!!!!!:)

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over 7 years ago

very helpful and i think i might have found my career

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over 6 years ago

I HAVE been a Entomologist for a long time im verry succesfull i love my job

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almost 7 years ago

can you incorporate writing with entomology?

what would it pay if you just start out?

where would you mainly work?

How often would you be gone on hunts?

where would you have to work?

Would there be time for a family?

How often would you be in the work force?

how old would you hane to be befpore you could retire?

Are there such thiongs as a holiday?

When would I be able to spend time with my family?

How much schooling would it take to do both occupations?

When do you get out of work each day?

Would you be on call? if so, can you be called at all hours of the night?

Are there many girls in this job?

Would girls be discriminated against because of gender?

would I have to live in a tent?

where would Entomology take me? Would I go as far as mexico or as far as Africa?

What are the vacation records?

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almost 7 years ago

how much schooling does it take to beacome a entomologist iam 14 years old

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over 6 years ago

how long would you need o stay on at school to be a Entomologist an 14

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over 5 years ago

well im only 13 but ive always wanted to be a person to study bugs because well im one of those nature people you know and there so weird its just facinating ive always wanted to find a new type of bug and i would love to touch them and name them after me but you know not alot of people you find new speices but if your lucky you might just find somthing new well thankyou for helping me find my dream job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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over 6 years ago

What is the coursework for this field?

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over 5 years ago

hi i love Uconn my sister goes there and she loves it not for the same reasons as me but i hear its really nice and this artical really helped me thank you

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almost 7 years ago

what is the pay for a new comewr per year?

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almost 6 years ago

hello!

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over 6 years ago

ferrrrggg

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almost 6 years ago

riley sucks jakes nostril..

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almost 5 years ago

i do this job with regard

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almost 6 years ago

hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!!!!!!!!!!!!1

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about 2 years ago

search for a job

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about 2 years ago

this is cool

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about 5 years ago

hello i like pie

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almost 6 years ago

thuis is good info

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over 2 years ago

wow I am the first one to comment in over 3 years. everyone doesn't know how to type and why wont this website answer any of these poor peoples question this website has a lot of great information

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over 3 years ago

OMG. This was really helpful, thank you so much!!!

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almost 4 years ago

My grand daughter is interested in (facinated with) and collects bugs. When she observes an insect that she can't catch, we seek out information, pictures and details on that insect by going online. Thanks to sites like yours, there is plenty of information for Little Mari to collect in her "Bug Book".

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about 4 years ago

I am doing my project on this! I luv insects!!!!

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over 4 years ago

Very informational website.

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over 4 years ago

I always love a good bug hunt and its my favorite thing to do in my pass time!!!!!!

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over 4 years ago

hey this an awesome website, but what is the apa format of this website

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almost 6 years ago

where are entomologists most in demand this is all i need for my project to finish

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over 6 years ago

nn

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over 6 years ago

how r u doing

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over 5 years ago

hi i love Uconn my sister goes there and she loves it not for the same reasons as me but i hear its really nice and this artical really helped me thank you

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over 5 years ago

idk what the heck this is for? but i'm researching this because i'm doing a project in school. but thanks for the information, it was really helpful(:

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over 5 years ago

idk what the heck this is for? but i'm researching this because i'm doing a project in school. but thanks for the information, it was really helpful(:

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over 5 years ago

Are there any hazards to being an entomologist? I am 17 and im doing my career research and i chose to be an entomologist because I love spiders and bugs.

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over 4 years ago

uck i hate insects you posers !!!!!!!!!!!!
suckers

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almost 5 years ago

hi i would love to know hoe to become emtomoligist so please help you weirdo!

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almost 5 years ago

hi i would love to know hoe to become emtomoligist so please help you weirdo!

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over 5 years ago

hi i love Uconn my sister goes there and she loves it not for the same reasons as me but i hear its really nice and this artical really helped me thank you

Vote down Vote up

over 5 years ago

hi i love Uconn my sister goes there and she loves it not for the same reasons as me but i hear its really nice and this artical really helped me thank you

Vote down Vote up

over 5 years ago

hi i love Uconn my sister goes there and she loves it not for the same reasons as me but i hear its really nice and this artical really helped me thank you

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over 5 years ago

Quetion I been in the pest control for a while already like 10 years. An would like to take the next big step, beside entomology career what other career is there to take a shot at.

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almost 5 years ago

hi i would love to know hoe to become emtomoligist so please help you weirdo!

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almost 5 years ago

hi i would love to know hoe to become emtomoligist so please help you weirdo!

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over 6 years ago

hey there



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about 5 years ago

RESUME





Name : Dr. (Mrs.) Meenakshi Srivastava



Address : 12, Barooni Khandak

Keshav Bhaduri Road

Model House

Lucknow -226001 (U.P.)

Ph. No.- (0522)2230808, 09532752122

e-mail: doctormeenakshi@yahoo.com



Date of birth : 01.03.1971



Nationality & Passport No. : Indian ; E2867093



Computer Literacy : Windows Operating system & MS Office



Spouse : Dr. Surendra Kumar

Associate Professor- BBD University Lko & Consultant Director-Lavanya Ayurveda Ltd Lucknow





Educational Qualifications:



Sl. No. Degree/ Certificate Year of Passing Board/ University Division



1 B.Ed. 2011 I.G.N.O.U. Delhi 1st

2 N.E.T.

(For Lectureship) 2001 A.S.R.B. (ICAR) Accredited by UGC & CSIR

3 Ph.D.

(Zoology -Entomology) 2000 Delhi University -



4 M.Sc.

(Zoology: Entomology) 1994 Kanpur University 1st



5 B.Sc.(Hons.)

Zoology 1992 Delhi University 2nd



6 Intermediate 1989 C.B.S.E. Delhi 1st



7 High School 1987 C.B.S.E. Delhi 2nd



Ph.D. Thesis Topic:- Effects of certain plant characteristics and seed powders on establishment of

Spodoptera exigua (Hubner)







Skill Development Training:

Learned to handle domesticated honeybees “Apis cerana and Apis mellifera” for pollination and reared them through out the year especially during dearth period.





Book Published :

Hospital Management: A Revolutionary Approach. (2009)

(Published by Adventure Publications Ltd. New Delhi)







WORK EXPERIENCES



03rd April 2006 to Till Now

Working in St. Teresa Day School & College, Lucknow as a ‘Sr. Teacher’

Responsibility & Duties:

(i) Taking classes in Junior /High School & Intermediate of Biology, Science & Environmental Science with Administrative activities

(ii) Organizing extra curricular activities like seminar, symposium, cultural prog. etc

(iii) Development of effective communication in between Student –Teacher & Guardian for smooth academic compliances



20th January 2005 to 07th November 2005

Worked in Deptt. of Pharmacy Babu Banarasi Das National Institute of Technology & Management, Lucknow as a ‘Lecturer’

Responsibility & Duties:

(i) Took lectures of Environmental Science in B.Pharma course

(ii) Organize Symposium, Seminars & Workshops for Industrial Delegates.

(iii) Research & Development activities related to Industrial Pesticides.



13th September 2000 to 31st December 2004

Worked in Plant Quarantine Division, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Pusa Campus, New Delhi as a ‘Research Associate’ in

(a) NATP (PB) Project entitled “Seed health testing of germplasm of different Agri-horticultural crops for pest free conservation.”

(b) Agricultural & Processed Food Product Export Development Authority (APEDA) funded project.

Responsibility & Duties:

(i) Quarantine clearance of germplasm of the imported as well as export materials.

(ii) Preparation of checklists of pests of quarantine importance.

(iii) Research related to quarantine treatment procedures.



24th Feb. 1995 to 31st March 1998

Worked in Division of Entomology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Pusa, New Delhi as ‘Senior Research Fellow’ in DBT funded Project entitled “Development of Transgenic Cotton Varieties Improved for Resistance to Cotton Bollworms”

Responsibility & Duties:

(i) Rearing of Pectinophora gossipyiella, Spodoptera litura and S. exigua on natural and artificial diet.

(ii) Rearing and experimentation of predators Chrysoperla carnea, Propylea dissecta, Cocciniella septempunctata and parasitoids Trichogramma brasiliensis, Bracon brevicornis, Chelonus blackburni.





WORKSHOPS, CONFERENCES & SEMINARS ATTENDED

 Sixth National Symposium of Aphidological Society, India. 28-31st Oct. 1996, at Department of Zoology, University of Gorakhpur-273 001, U. P., India.

 FAO Workshop on Sustainable Beekeeping Development and All India Honey Festival (APIEXI 98). 1-5th August 1998, Dharwad, Karnataka, India.

 Symposium on Plant Genetic Resource Management: Advances and Challenges. 1-3rd August 2001, at National Bureau Plant of Genetic Resources, Pusa Campus, New Delhi-110 012, India.

 National Symposium on Ancient Indian Science, Engineering and Technology Interfaced with the Modern Knowledge. October 12-13, 2001 organised by Vigyan Bharati, at Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Pusa, New Delhi-110 012.

 89th Indian Science Congress, January 3-7, 2002, held at University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226001.

 Seminar on “Integrated Pest Management and effect on Environment” Organised by Moti Lal Rastogi School of Management, Lucknow-226018.

 National Seminar on “Academicians Role and Responsibility In Producing Managers” Organised by Institute of Environment And Management and Moti Lal Rastogi School of Management, Lucknow.

 Workshop on “AIMA- Army Inspirational Leadership Series- Shaping Young Minds” on September 23, 2009 at 11 Gorkha Rifles Regiment Centre, Lucknow





PUBLICATIONS IN REFERRED JOURNALS /PROCEEDINGS

1. Srivastava B.G. and Srivastava Meenakshi. (1995). Phytophagous dipteran- A real threat to production In: Integrated Pest Management in Agriculture. Eds. G. M. Bharad, R. S. Bonde, S. A. Nimbalkar and S. V. Sande. Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Vidyapeeth, Akola, India. pp 550-552.

2. Meenakshi and Srivastava B. G. (1997). An artificial diet of Menochilus sexmaculatus Fab. In: J. of Aphidology, 11 (1) : pp 121-122

3. Kundu S.K., Jey Kumar P., Meenakshi and Gupta G. P. (1998). Conservation of Chrysoperla carnea Steph. in cotton ecosystem for sustainable IPM programme. In: I. J. of Entomology, 60 (3): pp 297-300.

4. Gupta G. P. and Meenakshi. (1998). Feeding potential of generalistic predator Chrysoperla carnea on Aphis craccivora and Corcyra cephalonica in laboratory. In: Proc. of International Symp. on Sustainable Agriculture in Hill Areas. October 29-31, 1998, Plampur, H.P., India.

5. Srivastava B. G. and Meenakshi. (1998). Apiculture as essential input for sustainable agriculture especially in hill areas. In: Proc. of International Symp. on Sustainable Agriculture in Hill Areas. October 29-31, 1998, Plampur, H.P., India.

6. Gupta G. P. and Meenakshi. (1998). Feeding potential and biology of predator, Propylea dissecta, on Aphis craccivora in laboratory. In: Proc. of International Conf. on Pest and Pesticide Management for Sustainable Agriculture. December 11-13, 1998, Kanpur, U. P, India, pp 89.

7. Meenakshi. (1998). Wonder tree neem (Azadirachta indica) in the grip of mealy bug. In: Proc. of International Conf. on Pest and Pesticide Management for Sustainable Agriculture. December 11-13, 1998, Kanpur, U. P., India, pp 190.

8. Mahapatro G. K., Meenakshi, and Gupta G. P. (1999). Nutritional studies for two noctuids, Earis vittella and Spodoptera exigua on natural diets in laboratory. In: Shashpa, 6 (7): pp 183-184.

9. Bhalla S., Gupta K., Lal. B., Kapur. M. L., Kumar N., Meenakshi, and Baloda R. S. (2001). Interception of Insect and Mite Pests in Germplasm under Exchange during the year 2000. In: Indian J. of Plant Genetic Resources. 14: pp 116-118.

10. Srivastava B. G., Tiwari A and Meenakshi. (2001). Role of pollinators in Emerging Scenario of Plant Protection for Increased Production of Ber (Zizyphus sp.). In: Proc. Of National Symposium on Plant Protection Strategies for Sustainable Agri-Horticulture. October 12-13, 2001, S. K. University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, R. S. Pura, Jammu-181 102, pp 37.

11. Srivastava, B. G. and Meenakshi. (2001). Beekeeping as an Integral Component in Swadeshi Science Movement of India. In: In Proc. of National Symposium on Ancient Indian Science, Engineering and Technology Interfaced with the Modern Knowledge. October 12-13, 2001, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Pusa, New Delhi-12, India, pp 134.

12. Srivastava B. G., Tiwari A and Meenakshi. (2002). Development of Pollen Supplement for Apis cerana Indica Fabracius. In: Presented poster in 89th Indian Science Congress, January 3-7, 2002, University of Lucknow, Lucknow.

13. Srivastava B. G., Tiwari A and Meenakshi. (2002). Nutritional Management of Beekeeping in India. In: 6th Asian Apicultural Association International Conference and World Apiexpo-2002. Feb 24 to March 1, 2002 Banglore, India, pp 179-180.

14. Srivastava B. G., Tiwari A and Meenakshi. (2002). Beekeeping as an essential input for augmenting quality production. In: National Symposium on Agriculture in Changing Global Scenario. Feb. 21-23, 2002 Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-12, India, pp 425-426.

15. Gupta K, Bhalla S., Kapur M. L., Lal B., Singh C., Meenakshi, Baloda R.S.and Kumar N. (2002). Interception of insect and mite pests in imported germplasm during the Year 2001. In: Indian Journal of Plant Protection. 30(2): pp 196-199.

16. Gupta K, Bhalla S., Kapur M. L., Lal B., Singh C., Meenakshi, Baloda R.S.and Kumar N. (2004). Insect pests intercepted in exotic planting material during quarantine processing in 2002. In: Indian Journal of Plant Protection. 32(1): pp 49-52

17. Srivastava B. G., Tiwari A., and Meenakshi. (2005). Development of pollen supplements for Apis cerena Fabricus. In: Indian Journal of Entomology. (Accepted)

18. Gupta K, Bhalla S., Kapur M. L., Lal B., Singh C., Baloda R. S., Meenakshi, Kumar N. and Singh N. (2005). Insect- pests intercepted during quarantine processing of exotic planting material in 2003. In: Indian Journal of Plant Protection. 33(1): pp 51-54.

19. Gupta K, Bhalla S., Kapur M. L., Singh C., Kumar N., Baloda R.S., Meenakshi, and Lal B. (2005). Insect-pests intercepted in introduced planting material during quarantine from 2000-04. Indian J. Plant Genet. Resouc. 18(1): pp 133-136

20. Shashi Bhalla, Kavita Gupta, Manju Lata Kapur, Charan Singh, Naresh Kumar, Meenakshi, R S Baloda, B Lal And R K Khetarpal (2008). Detection of insect-pests in indigenous germplasm during 2000-05 Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences (Accepted)

21. Surendra Kumar, Anurag Prakash, Meenakshi Srivastava (2009). An Exploratory Research on the Nature and Behaviour of Ethical Orientation of Future Business Leaders in India. In: Integral Review-A Journal of Management (ISSN O974-8032). 2(2): pp12-24

22. Surendra Kumar, Meenakshi Srivastava (2011). A Strategic Approach towards Resolving Conflict in Work Team. In: Journal of Motilal Rastogi School of Management (ISSN O974-4037). 4 (1): pp 13-18.

23. Surendra Kumar, Meenakshi Srivastava (2011). A Critical Review on Perception & Benefits of Customer Relationship Management System in Indian Private Hospitals. In: Abhyayan :A Journal of Management Sciences (ISSN 2249-1066) 1(2): pp 21-25



(Dr. Meenakshi Srivastava)

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3 months ago

I WISH THERE WAS AN AN ARTHROPOD JOB SO I CAN STUDY ALL ARTHROPODS

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10 months ago

Hi, can you please tell me what kind of books would a wanna-be entomologist would read? I am researching for a character in a book.